By - Preston Gralla

Windows 10 cheat sheet

Windows 10 is the best operating system that’s come along from Microsoft in a long time. It’s a shape-shifter that changes its interface depending upon whether you’re using a traditional computer or a touch-based one. It undoes the damage wrought by Windows 8, including eliminating the awkward Charms bar and bringing back the long-mourned Start menu. A lot more has

By - Preston Gralla

Microsoft’s Windows Update system is broken. Will it ever be fixed?

For many years, Microsoft has struggled to get the way it updates Windows right — and mostly got it wrong. But a month ago, I wrote about how Microsoft finally got a piece of it right, by giving people control over whether to install the twice-annual feature updates, such as the recent Windows 10 May 2019 Update. Boy, was I

By - Preston Gralla

It’s time for Microsoft to kill the Microsoft Store — or else fix it

Which of these four things is different from the others: the iOS App Store, Android’s Google Play, the Chrome browser’s Chrome Web Store and the Microsoft Store built into Windows 10? If you answered the Microsoft Store, you’re right. While the other three download stores host many thousands of useful apps of every type and description, and have a thriving,

By - Preston Gralla

Review: Windows 10 May 2019 Update unleashes a spring surprise

We’ve become used to the routine: Microsoft releases one of its twice-annual Windows 10 feature updates, often delayed due to bugs, and the world yawns. And throughout most of the six months of previews for Windows 10 version 1903, a.k.a. the May 2019 Update, it looked like it was going to be the usual routine again. Except this time, it’s

By - Preston Gralla

Microsoft surrenders in its Windows Update war with users

Most businesses know that a war with the people who buy and use their products is a war they can’t win. Microsoft has belatedly recognized this with regard to its Windows Update policies. And if you’ve been paying attention to shifts in the corporate culture in Redmond, the company’s surrender to its customers shouldn’t be a surprise. The long-simmering war

By - Preston Gralla

How to fix six Windows 10 headaches

Microsoft Windows 10 has gone a long way towards fixing the problems that were endemic with earlier versions of Windows — notably Windows 8. But it’s still far from a perfect operating system and has its share of headaches. Looking through various user discussions (and tapping our own experiences) we’ve identified six problems that a lot of people are complaining

By - Preston Gralla

How to protect your privacy in Windows 10

There has been some concern that Windows 10 gathers too much private information from users. Whether you think Microsoft’s operating system crosses the privacy line or just want to make sure you protect as much of your personal life as possible, we’re here to help. Here’s how to protect your privacy in just a few minutes. Note: This story has

By - Preston Gralla

Here’s why Microsoft raised the white flag on Edge

Microsoft stunned most tech watchers several months ago when it announced it was abandoning 25 years of its go-it-alone browser strategy and would replace Edge’s web rendering engine with one developed by the Chromium open-source project. The shock wasn’t just that Microsoft was turning to open source for its browser. It was that Chromium also powers Edge’s main rival, Google’s

By - Preston Gralla

Outlook vs. Gmail: Which works better for business?

Some people will tell you that social media, chat platforms and videoconferencing have replaced email as the most important means of communication in the workplace. Don’t believe them. Email remains the lifeblood of business and will do so into the foreseeable future. When it comes to email in the business world, there are two main products to consider: Microsoft Outlook

By - Preston Gralla

Is Microsoft crazy to diss Office 2019? Like a fox.

When was the last time you heard a company denigrate its own product — and practically beg you not to use it? Most likely never. Well, there’s a first time for everything, and Microsoft is breaking ground in product marketing in a decidedly odd way, telling its customers not to use Office 2019 because it’s old, kludgy, hard to use